Bear Lodge Morning

After the previous evening’s sunset, complete with smoke, Goddess and I settled down into our tent for the night.

Soon after midnight we heard the rumble of thunder.  A perfect soundtrack for the location.  It rumbled past sunrise, but not a drop of rain.

 

Korean Lantern

Enough landscapes for this week.

But we’re still keeping with the colors.

Gyeongbokgung Palace grounds, Seoul, South Korea

We were lucky enough to be able to visit South Korea this past April, visiting with friends and sightseeing.  It was a great time to visit, since it was after the bitter cold of the Korean winter and before the jangma (“plum rain”, or spring rainy season) and the oppressive humidity of summer.

I was in my element again, enjoying an Asian culture while taking pictures of traditional architecture.

Many more photos to follow.

Have you ever had to chance to enjoy an Asian culture?

Pilot Cumulus

A flashback to a day last spring.

Goddess and I were sitting with a friend on a bluff overlooking the Rogue Valley in southern Oregon, watching the rain showers roll past.

There are five climbers silhouetted on the summit of Pilot Rock that are only visible in the original image.  Discovering them made me smile, thinking of another day a couple of years ago where we made that same climb with friends.

Late Dunes

Mesquite Flats Sand Dunes, Death Valley National Park, California

We missed the fabled “superbloom” by a couple of weeks, but arrived just in time for California’s spring break.  Luckily we were able to secure a “camp spot” in the middle of a graded gravel parking lot not far from this view.

Back to the Old

After almost a year and a half of strictly phone captured/created images, I am now back to importing images from my DSLR and processing on the computer.

It was interesting to see how quickly I was back in the groove of things, remembering shortcuts and keystrokes for tools in Lightroom and Photoshop.  I couldn’t tell you what I had for lunch yesterday, but I had no problems with my workflow.

I was pleased with that.

Long-time readers may recall that we finished our thru-hike last October.  By the end of the month, Goddess and I were down in San Diego to visit friends, pick up our car and all of my camera gear.  After that I was shooting not just with the phone, but the DSLRs that I missed so much on the trail.

Since then I have filled a few memory cards with images as we traveled across the US, hopped over to Europe over the holidays, back to and across the US, over to South Korea, then back to the US.  Once back, we did another cross-country round trip.

I actually reached a point last spring where I had filled all of my available memory cards.  In a panic, we were lucky to find an actual photography-focused store in Moab, Utah, where I was able to pick up another card.

A couple of weeks later, we swung into Ashland, Oregon, where we lived before our hike.  I tossed all of the full memory cards in our safe deposit box for safe-keeping.

That’s where they sit to this day.

So all of the photos that I took from November until March are stored away until we can get back down there to collect them.

Everything I have access to now is from late-March until now. So the pictures I will be posting here are completely random, unrelated to how we traveled.

Yet exactly how we traveled.

For those who we visited as we meandered the world, you’ll know exactly what I mean.


Late March, Southern Utah.

After leaving Moab and the incredible beauty of Arches National Park (those pics are in storage), we headed southwest, camping in Capitol Reef National Park (pics in storage), then Kodachrome Basin State Park, where we set up base to explore the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and Bryce Canyon National Park (guess where those pics are).

For days I had been excited about the prospect of Zion National Park.  It’s my favorite national park in the US and it would be Goddess’ first visit.

We had been flying by the seat of our pants, making up our stops as we went along.

This time it bit us in the butt.

Not having to worry about kids and schedules, we were not tracking that it was spring break in Utah.

Goddess’ first visit to Zion National Park consisted of entering through the east gate and driving right out the west gate.  A quick check of the campgrounds showed them all full.  One spot was available for the price of a decent hotel room, so we passed on it and drove a few hours to get an actual decent hotel room.

This was one of the views as we exited the park.

Signal Peak, shrouded in snow-showers.

I am always amazed when I hear folks say that the desert is drab and boring.  Then saddened, because they clearly don’t know how to look at a desert.  Some come around, but most often don’t.

If you’re one of those that don’t think that deserts are interesting, stick around.

I may just change your mind.


Who would have thought that I would have a more difficult time remembering how to use WordPress on the computer than Photoshop?  Guess which is significantly more complicated.