Food

So last week I mentioned that we would not be partaking in any snow sports, as we were in the midst of a warm up that would make conditions less than ideal. Well, that warm up happened, as did some other things. So you won’t have to suffer through pics of us on the slopes this week.

Knowing that would happen, I asked for topics. A dear friend commented that I should talk about food, as it has been an ongoing discussion between us lately (and for many years).

A professionally trained chef*, she has some incredible insights to food preparation and use. Other education in psychology leads to a fascination with relationships with food, which is where our conversation has been going lately. And I think that’s where she wanted me to go with this post.

But I won’t.

Instead, I’ll just post a picture from several years ago. It was a great afternoon snack with Goddess. Until that point, I really disliked white wines, even as we lived in the heart of the white wine region of Germany. Then we had a proper chardonnay at a roadside café in Dijon, France, accompanied by some lovely escargot.

That buttery chardonnay was a wine changer for me.

It didn’t hurt that the afternoon light was perfect for a picture.

* She’ll protest that I called her a chef, insisting that she is not. But she is, especially to us lay-people. Besides, I have pictures of her, in an official setting, where she’s wearing her toque blanche. That’s good enough for me.

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Upheld

This photo has become a tradition for this blog on each Christmas Eve since 2010. This ornament is appropriate, as it was spied that year hanging in a vendor’s booth at the Christmas Market in Vienna, Austria.

I know that it has been six months since my last post here, even though I have a deep pool of content from which to pull to have filled up that time. But after 11 years of posting here, I’ve become ambivalent towards this platform and, honestly, the lack of interaction in what has become, predominantly, a one-sided conversation. But that’s an issue for me to figure out, should this rise up the priority list.

Regardless, know that our wish for you is to have a peaceful end of the calendar year adhering to whatever practices bring you comfort and joy.

Hopefully you will find a bit of relaxation in there too.

Christmas Eve Globe Lights Ornament by Bill Anders Photography

Tradition

Well, it’s already 2015 in some parts of the world, but it’s still New Year’s Eve here and in Europe.

Our German neighbors introduced us to their NYE traditions and this is one of our favorites, watching Dinner for One.  It has now become a tradition on this blog.  Sit back, have a good laugh, then be safe out there this evening.

Goddess and I hope you have a great year!


Here’s a fun little read on the history of Dinner for One (click here), along with the longer cut, complete with German introduction.

Darkroom View

A place where I know that I’ll always feel at home.

Even though it’s half a world away.

Darkroom View

I absolutely love the work that comes out of the room that provided this view.

Lots of nuggets here.

How many can you find?

Tradition

Well, it’s New Year’s Eve.  By the time this is posted, it’s already 2014 in some parts of the world, evening in Europe.

Our German neighbors introduced us to their NYE traditions, and this is one of our favorites, watching Dinner for One.

Goddess and I hope you have a great year!

Mount Shasta View

Although this was taken only eight days ago, it sure seems a lot longer than that.  It’s been a busy week, but a good week.

That and the fact that I know the view looks nothing like that this morning.  Yesterday we received 4-6″ of snow in just a few short hours and we’re 5,500′ below the summit of Mount Ashland, from which this photo was taken.  I know the mountain received quite a bit too, as I was able to watch it all day on a webcam.  By mid-afternoon, a few hardy folks were up there in the middle of it, strapping on their snowboards and trying to eke out a run in the few inches of snow covering the rocks.

They weren’t having much success.

Anyway, this picture was taken on Thanksgiving afternoon.  It was a balmy day in the 50’s.  Enough to get us sweating on the approach to the summit, which sounds more impressive than the reality that we parked about a mile away from the summit, just a couple of hundred feet lower in elevation.

As you can see, a beautiful day.  A grand view of Mount Shasta, some 54 miles distant, as the crow flies.

Mount Shasta View

It was a great Thanksgiving, spending the day with friends we haven’t seen since 2006, all of us taking pics and looking at things in our own unique ways.  It’s always fun to see how two (or three or four or more) people can stand side by side, take pictures and come out with significantly different images.

For their take on the view, please browse over to their post at Welliver Photography.

Today

We’ve found that the time difference here in the US is actually harder to work around than when we have lived in other countries overseas.

And since it will be way past bedtime for her when I get home from school tomorrow –

Happy Birthday Mom!  😀

These wine glasses were used a few years ago to toast my parents on their anniversary, as we floated down the Seine looking at the passing sites of Paris as the sun set.

It was a fantastic experience.

Let’s do it again!

Changing Gears

After the crush of the last couple of weeks getting the web page ready and making sure things like the Facebook page were ready to go, it was nice to launch the site.

But now it’s time to change gears.

Literally.

After the page launch late Sunday night and just a few hours of sleep, on Monday morning I started attending class at the United Bicycle Institute (UBI).  Attending this school was the driving force behind the decision for Goddess and I to move to this town.

And it’s all good so far.

I’ll likely post more on the school starting next week, assuming I have time.  This week is their basic course, focused on those bicycle riders who know very little about maintenance.  I do have quite a leg up on this class, but I am still learning quite a bit.  And having a great time doing it.  Next week is when we jump into the professional mechanic-focused curriculum, which already promises to be faster paced and much more stressful, since that leads to certifications.

I’m giddy with excitement to get after it.

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As I prepped the web site for launch last week, I wanted to fill in some holes in the portfolio.  There are still more to fill, but I need to keep focus on school.

So as I was perusing the archives, I ran across this one.  I am not sure why I passed it by after that trip to Vienna, but I did.

Luckily we have it for now.

That’s the Café Central in Vienna, Austria.

And if anyone is curious, no that is not an HDR image (I don’t do those).  Just a few focused curves to enhance contrasts and give it that pop.

Goddess and I were in town to celebrate an anniversary and explore the city in detail, after having only made a brief (one day) visit the year before.

If you ever get a chance to go – GO!  Vienna is such an enchanting town, especially down the back alleys and side streets.

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From now until August 31st, 2013, use the code BAPLaunch when you check out at billandersphoto and save 25% on pre-shipping costs. Thank you for your support!

BAP-Launch

Launch

It has been quiet around these parts for the past week or so.

Usually I apologize for that, but this time I don’t think that I will, even though I do appreciate my loyal readers.

I really do.

So where was the focus?  My new web site, of which this blog is a part.  Some of you might have even noticed some changes here.

It’s all part of taking my photography a bit more seriously, including delving more into portraiture.

Photo Logo

So please click on the image above (which takes you to http://billandersphoto.com), take a look around, kick the tires and leave a comment.  Perhaps buy a print or three.

I even dropped the prices 25% to mark the occasion.

BAP-Launch

Just click on that coupon and a new window will open.  Browse and pick to your heart’s content, then enter that code upon checkout.  And you’ll be in like Flynn.

If you had browsed my galleries before and think you have seen it all, please look again, especially in the Travel section of my Portfolio.  There are new photos in there.  And quite a few images that I have reworked for one reason or another.

So you might find something different.

As always, thank you for taking the time to stop by my littler corner of the sphere.

Koosah Falls Detail

Well that was a string of desert photos.  I’m not done yet, but it’s time for a break.

Perhaps it should be considered a teaser from this weekend’s trip.

A waterfall on the lee-side of the Cascades.

Koosha Falls Detail

Koosha Falls is one of three major falls on the McKenzie river in Linn County, Oregon.  It is a beautiful place and I hope to get back there in better conditions.

It was too damn sunny!

So if the falls weren’t blown out, then the trees would be.

Of course, I could have taken the easy route and spit out one of those ghastly HDR images.

But that’s not me.

So instead it was time to focus on the details.  Which I love.

My favorite part of this image is that fine narrow fall to the left, landing on the rock below, splitting and continuing its path into the river.

Fine as wine.

Of course, there are so many details in the moss and rocks that are just as intriguing.

Anyway, this fall typically runs 64 feet (19.5 meters).  During high flow in spring, perhaps as high as 70 feet (21.3 meters).  As we were looking at it, I wondered out loud to Goddess – “I wonder if anyone has run it”.  But immediately dismissed that idea, since the best line, just outside image frame right, would be the left side of the falls (as the kayaker approaches).  However, that side of the fall lands very hard on a very large boulder, sending spray everywhere.

I quickly dismissed the idea.

Boy, was I wrong – click here to read (and see) an attempt.

My hat off to those that tackle big water.