Shasta Flare

Mount Shasta, California, on a crisp autumn afternoon last month.

I had already captured quite a few images of the mountain a few miles back on the highway.  Then I caught a glimpse of this plane as I was driving.  Luckily there was a pull-out up ahead and we’re glad that we have functional anti-lock brakes.  Most importantly, I’m glad that I have an understanding Goddess.

Thankee-sai

Enjoying the post-sunset colors at White Sands National Monument, New Mexico.

Taken a year ago, returning to that spot where she said yes so many years before that have led to many days like today.  And she still puts up with me, including waking up the next morning with a heavy layer of frost coating our sleeping bags.

We wouldn’t have it any other way.

Thank you, my Goddess!

Concert View

It has been more than a bit crazy here lately, hence the infrequent posts.  We certainly did not need any distractions.

So we got one and took advantage of it.

Over the last weekend, we put 1,800 miles on the car making a quick run down to California to visit a dear friend, spend the weekend watching bands, back to Ashland to quickly take care of some unfinished business after leaving there in June, saw a few friends there (but not enough), then beat feet back home.

Although it was long hours in the car once again, it was a trip good for the soul.  Not only was it two solid days of auditory overload, but fantastic scenery and great friends.  Plus, I was finally able to collect the rest of my memory cards that had been in safekeeping since April.  Perhaps I can get to the pictures that I took from last October through April and post a few here.

So what is with the title?  It is the typical concert view anymore.  At the first flash of light, the first beat of the drum, the first strum of a guitar, all of the damned phones go up.  I can’t see squat and I’m 6-feet tall.  My poor Goddess, who is nowhere near 6-feet tall, just gives up.

aftershock-phones

And before someone cracks wise about me taking this picture with my phone, there wasn’t anyone behind me other than the guys at the sound boards.  And they were on a platform about 3 feet off the ground.

But other than that, we had a great weekend.  Hopefully you did too and that you are about to enjoy another.

My Sunshine

A throwback to last April, watching the showers, hoping for some lightning or other exciting action.

Which may not have been smart, since we were on the highest point for several miles around.

But that’s what we do.

She’s looking at the last bit of last winter’s snow on Mount Ashland.  They’ve already received their first snowfall.  Here’s hoping that they have another great year.  They really need it.

Back to the Old

After almost a year and a half of strictly phone captured/created images, I am now back to importing images from my DSLR and processing on the computer.

It was interesting to see how quickly I was back in the groove of things, remembering shortcuts and keystrokes for tools in Lightroom and Photoshop.  I couldn’t tell you what I had for lunch yesterday, but I had no problems with my workflow.

I was pleased with that.

Long-time readers may recall that we finished our thru-hike last October.  By the end of the month, Goddess and I were down in San Diego to visit friends, pick up our car and all of my camera gear.  After that I was shooting not just with the phone, but the DSLRs that I missed so much on the trail.

Since then I have filled a few memory cards with images as we traveled across the US, hopped over to Europe over the holidays, back to and across the US, over to South Korea, then back to the US.  Once back, we did another cross-country round trip.

I actually reached a point last spring where I had filled all of my available memory cards.  In a panic, we were lucky to find an actual photography-focused store in Moab, Utah, where I was able to pick up another card.

A couple of weeks later, we swung into Ashland, Oregon, where we lived before our hike.  I tossed all of the full memory cards in our safe deposit box for safe-keeping.

That’s where they sit to this day.

So all of the photos that I took from November until March are stored away until we can get back down there to collect them.

Everything I have access to now is from late-March until now. So the pictures I will be posting here are completely random, unrelated to how we traveled.

Yet exactly how we traveled.

For those who we visited as we meandered the world, you’ll know exactly what I mean.


Late March, Southern Utah.

After leaving Moab and the incredible beauty of Arches National Park (those pics are in storage), we headed southwest, camping in Capitol Reef National Park (pics in storage), then Kodachrome Basin State Park, where we set up base to explore the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and Bryce Canyon National Park (guess where those pics are).

For days I had been excited about the prospect of Zion National Park.  It’s my favorite national park in the US and it would be Goddess’ first visit.

We had been flying by the seat of our pants, making up our stops as we went along.

This time it bit us in the butt.

Not having to worry about kids and schedules, we were not tracking that it was spring break in Utah.

Goddess’ first visit to Zion National Park consisted of entering through the east gate and driving right out the west gate.  A quick check of the campgrounds showed them all full.  One spot was available for the price of a decent hotel room, so we passed on it and drove a few hours to get an actual decent hotel room.

This was one of the views as we exited the park.

Signal Peak, shrouded in snow-showers.

I am always amazed when I hear folks say that the desert is drab and boring.  Then saddened, because they clearly don’t know how to look at a desert.  Some come around, but most often don’t.

If you’re one of those that don’t think that deserts are interesting, stick around.

I may just change your mind.


Who would have thought that I would have a more difficult time remembering how to use WordPress on the computer than Photoshop?  Guess which is significantly more complicated.