Yep, He Got Us!

Over the past few weeks I have been culling my photo database.  Starting with my the first images in 2004 when I switched from analog, I’ve been looking at every single one.  I’m up to 2011 so far.

As I look at each one, I’m looking for:

– Technical quality – is it in focus, is it exposed properly, etc.

– Duplication – Is it a duplicate?  If so, is it the best of the rest?

– Uniqueness – Is the image of an event that can’t be repeated?  Will I have the chance to observe it again?

– Sentiment – Does the image have some sort of sentimental value?  Oftentimes, this and the previous step are the same.

It can be quite tedious.

I was never shy with the shutter button when I was shooting film.  That hasn’t changed since I moved to digital, but I know that I do shoot more.  Rarely did I have a 4-roll day with film, but I can easily shoot 200 images in a session.

But they all aren’t keepers.

I haven’t kept track exactly on numbers, but I know that I’ve regained ~120GB of hard drive space.  That’s at a time when I was needing to get at least one new hard drive for storage.  In this case, it’s almost “free money”.

And I’ve already started using the process for the new shoots.  During the session that included last Friday’s image, I shot 58 frames.  I applied those same four steps to the session and now have 10 frames to pick from.

Especially when it comes to landscape, the “duplicate” step is the deciding factor.  I can click back and forth between two images dozens of times to see the minor differences.  Sometimes it’s a matter of flipping the coin.


Anyway, what in the world does all of this have to do with the title?

Bear with me.  It does.

I wanted to post a slightly different angle of Mount McLoughlin, one from a real winter.  The last one we’ve had in this area was two years ago.  That’s when the mountain lakes froze hard enough that folks could go out and fish, ski, snowmobile, etc.

So I jumped forward to 2013 and went for images of Mount McLoughlin, viewed from the frozen surface of Lake of the Woods and worked one to post here.  Then I realized that today would be the seventh anniversary of Skinny’s Gotcha Day.  Although in reality, it’s our Gotcha Day.

For those of you not familiar, when adopting a greyhound there is a house visit.  The visit is to make sure that the potential adopters have a suitable house and enclosed yard, plus watch the interaction with the greyhounds, the adopters and their families, both human and animal.  For such a home visit, a few greyhounds are brought along.  They are happy, social animals.

We had our eye on a specific greyhound that we had met a couple of times.  The adoption volunteers brought him, along with a couple of other greyhounds, including Skinny.  Skinny wasn’t on the list to be adopted.  Instead he was being reintroduced to the home-visit process and new people after he had been returned to the adoption agency.  He didn’t mesh well with his previous adopted family and had, as we learned, a “pupitude”.

Full on attitude.

So the group enters the house.  The grey that we had our eye on and the others shyly enter and sniff around, staying close to the volunteers.  Not Skinny.  He immediately explores the whole house, then flops down in the middle of the living room floor.

He announced he was home.

And he was.

He never lost that pupitude.

Never, not even at the end.

He still makes us smile.

Thanks for picking us, Skinny!



The last few weeks have been much more work than play.  Although compared to work in years past, this work is still play.

The days are filled with culling and moving the belongings as well as researching and planning for the long walk.  Other than cataloging items or recording other items before disposing of them, I hadn’t grabbed the camera in almost a month.

That’s bad.

It was time to get out for a shoot that wasn’t about working.  Although it was long walk related.

We drove the approximate route of a possible self-imposed deviation from the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) that we’re considering taking this summer.  It doesn’t really increase or decrease the length of the walk, but might make a minor resupply easier while getting us more consistent access to water on a 30-mile stretch of the trail.

That access means that we’d have to carry less water, which is less weight.  But more exposure to mosquitoes.  It’s a tradeoff we’ll consider along the way and likely not make a call until we’re back here in Oregon.

All while keeping in mind a quote from a much faster thru-hiker than us when referring to part of the trail that we would bypass:

“As soon as we crossed the highway, it was like walking into a wall of mosquitoes.  There were hundreds at a time all day every day.  Carry DEET and a gun to shoot yourself with”.  – Straight Jacket

And we’re considering a route with more water.

Granted, we’ll be later in the season, around mid-August, when the mosquitoes really die off up near the mountain lakes, but they’ll still be an issue.  Perhaps those will be the days that we get in 30 miles per day to just try to get through it.

A bit of manic hiking, perhaps.

Once we covered part of that detour, we hiked, following the PCT north into that bit of what would be mosquito hell in a few months, then turning back south, crossing the highway and hoping to get a good view of Mount McLoughlin.  The day had been clear and I was hoping to get some good late afternoon shots of the snow-covered mountains.

Of course, once we got into a clearing, we could see the clouds moving in.  Mind you, I like the clouds.  They give some interest and texture to what could be  otherwise boring.

But these clouds were getting thicker to the west and really cutting down on the sunlight.  I rushed ahead, tramping over the crusty snow and bare trail to find a good vantage point.  I left Goddess behind and she wasn’t too pleased with that.  But we were losing light.

The view turned out OK.  Not quite what I was hoping for, but it was part of a few hours out on the trail.  That’s always a good thing.

Plus we were able to attend a viewing of a new movie covering the John Muir Trail (JMT), a 210-mile trail in the Sierra Nevada mountains.  During our long walk this summer, we’ll cover about 160 miles of that trail, as they share tread.

The movie is a documentary of two ultra-marathon runners who set a “fastest known time” for the trail back in 2013.  It just so happens that one of the runners, Hal Koerner, owns our local running shop and is a certifiable badass.

This trailer gives a glimpse of some of the beauty that we’ll be walking through.

How’s that for motivation?



A couple of posts ago, I mentioned that if anyone had any questions about this idea of hiking the PCT this year, to ask.

Twice this week I was asked “so does this mean that you’re going to be homeless?”

In the traditional sense, yes.

We will turn over the keys to the house that we’ve been renting for the last couple of years.  All of our stuff, well the stuff that hasn’t been donated, recycled or thrown away, will be in storage.

Once we put the car in storage and step off from the southern terminus of the trail at Campo, California, everything we have or need will be on our backs.

I will carry the shelter, Jennifer will carry the kitchen and we’ll each carry the stuff that we each need for the hike.

That’s it – we will have a house and we’ll be together.

That’s home.

We’ll just have a different view out front every morning.

After the hike?  We don’t know right now.  That’s part of the fun of the hike.  We’ll figure out where it takes us.

The picture at the top is the view of one home.  It was the last morning of a long hitch of trail work down in California.  It was the middle of summer, August 5th to be exact.

It looks like snow on the ground, doesn’t it?

It wasn’t.  That’s the remnants of the hail storm we had overnight.  By 2am there were several inches of hailstones blanketing the entire area, but most of it had melted in the summer warmth by sunrise.  The evaporational cooling created quite a thick layer of fog over the area by the time we broke camp.

That little tent did a fine job of protecting that young man through the worst of the rain, the hail and the runoff.  It was extremely loud inside my tent, which was protected by trees.  I still can’t imagine how loud it was for him out in that meadow.  But he emerged in the morning with a big smile on his face.

That was a fine home.

Do you have any questions about this journey of ours?  Let me know and I’ll talk about it.

Thanks for reading.


A few weeks ago we announced our sponsorship from Yama Mountain Gear through a program that the owner Gen Shimizu calls mYAMAdventure.

And for those of you who know of our connection with Japan, his company logo is perfect:

This was our view of sunrise from the summit of Fujiyama (Mount Fuji), along with many hundreds of others, taken on the morning of 17 July, 2004.

Just having moments like that gives us many, many reasons to be thankful for the opportunities that we’ve had.

This year is no exception with our long walk.  An opportunity that we know is so completely outside the realm of consideration for the majority of the world.  For that we know we are lucky.

As you might recall, we announced our sponsorship in mid-December.  If you don’t recall, it’s likely you are amongst the hundred or so new followers of this blog since then; if that’s you, hang on for the ride.

Back then we mentioned that part of the sponsorship is our part in helping raise funds for the Pacific Crest Trail Association (PCTA), the organization responsible for maintaining and advocating for the trail.  It’s an organization that I spent a good portion of 2014 working with and we’re proud to continue supporting.

It’s early in the new year and we are already up to 8% of our total goal of raising $4,000 for the PCTA, so that they, along with their volunteers, can continue to maintain the trail.

For those of you who have donated (especially you anonymous donors that we can’t thank directly) – THANK YOU!!!

If you’re considering donating, we would appreciate it greatly.  All this year as we’re walking the path from Mexico to Canada, as well as in the following years as we continue to work on the trail so that others may follow.

Online fundraising for Bill and Jennifer Anders fundraising for the PCTA with mYAMAdventure
Please ignore the “raised” amount. The widget works fine in the editor, but posts wrong here. :\

And if you’re curious how your donation might be used, just click on the graphic above.  It will take you to our fundraising page which has several different suggested donation levels, along with examples of how that amount might be used to maintain the trial.

Thank you so much for you consideration and your support!

Bill & Jennifer [trail names pending]



Last Day

Hopefully you’ve had a relaxing holiday season and are rested before getting back after it tomorrow.

I know, I know.  More time.

Unfortunately, time waits for no one.

And that includes my winter solstice sale.  It ends today, Sunday, January 4, 2015 at midnight Pacific Standard Time.

All products are 20% off (does not apply to shipping costs).  Just enter Winter14 in the coupon field when you are ready to check out.  Click on the coupon below to start browsing or on the photo above to go directly to that image.

BAP - Winter14

Thank you for your support!

And Happy New Year!!!!

McLoughlin Clear Sunset

The nice thing about having views like this within a quick drive is that we can try and try and try.  Sometimes the scene cooperates, sometimes not.  Sometimes somewhere in-between.

Some five days prior, the scene did not cooperate.  We were in the clouds and it was snowing fairly heavily.  Driving up this day, the scene looked to be cooperating, as there were low clouds hugging the base of Mount McLoughlin as a skirt.

By the time the sun was setting, it was somewhere in-between.  The clouds had dissipated, but the light was nice.

That’s a fair trade.

The time also gave Goddess a chance to check out her new backpack, lightly loaded, as she walked around on the fresh powder.

That made it just about perfect.  A crisp late afternoon, fresh snow, our footprints the only ones to be seen, a fresh cup of hot beverage (water in this case, since Goddess forgot where she put the tea bags; they were promptly found in her pack once we got home), beautiful late afternoon light and only the sound of the eagles screeching in the trees.

Yep, just about perfect.

Just a reminder, through this upcoming weekend I have a 20% off sale going on over at Bill Anders Photography.  Yep, even including the photo above.

All products are 20% off (does not apply to shipping costs).  Just enter Winter14 in the coupon field when you are ready to check out.  Click on the coupon below to start browsing or on the photo above to go directly to that image.

BAP - Winter14Thank you for your support!



This photo has become a tradition on this blog on Christmas Eve, now on its fourth year running.

Why is that?  There are so many different ways to view this, if you want to look.  So many different meanings, if you wish to look.

However you choose to look at it, just know that my wish for you have a peaceful end of the calendar year, adhering to whatever practices bring you comfort and joy and hopefully a bit of relaxation.

Christmas Eve Globe Lights Ornament by Bill Anders Photography


GlobesWe are marking the first full day of winter today with a grin.  Yesterday was the kick-off for this year’s Winter Solstice offering over on my photography site and it was a good day (thank you everyone!).

But if you’re following via social media sites, they do a fine job of squashing certain posts that contain certain words, especially words that are a single-word representation of an offering of anything at a reduced level of currency.  Why?  Because they want us to pay them to increase viewership of those specific posts to normal levels.  Or pay even more to increase viewership even higher.

If you are looking for a holiday present, it is too late to get it this week, but if you’re looking for a different look on your wall, now is your chance!  Please click on the picture above and you’ll see the code at the top of my website.

Again, thank you all for your support!!!

Winter Solstice Sale

In a few short hours it will be the official winter solstice for those of us north of the equator.

For some that means it’s now the the beginning of a long, dreary winter.  A season to dread.  But not us.  Winter is another great season to get outside, explore and play.

This past Friday was opening day for our local ski mountain.  Goddess and I were able to get more than a few runs in on uncrowded slopes before school let out for the holidays.  And the rain today.

It’s currently raining up on the mountain, on top of the minimal snow.  Hopefully it doesn’t melt the snow and start another rough winter for the mountain, which never opened last winter for the first time in its 50-year history.

Fingers crossed.

As is tradition here on the solstices and equinoxes, I’m offering a sale on my photography.

All products are 20% off (does not apply to shipping costs).  Just enter Winter14 in the coupon field when you are ready to check out.  Just click on the coupon below to start browsing.

BAP - Winter14Thank you so much for your continued support.  I do appreciate you!

Happy Holidays

I know that today is the last day of school for most school districts as we head into the holidays.

If you’re traveling, please be safe.  If you aren’t, enjoy where you are and who you are with.

And however you spend the holidays, please take a moment to reflect upon how lucky you are.  Because if you have the access and the capability to read this and see the picture below, you have plenty for which to be thankful.

A vendor’s bowl full of choices in a souq (market) in the Muslim quarter of  Jerusalem’s Old City.